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Defensa eslava

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  • hace 4 meses

    AhmedM_12

    Undecided

  • hace 8 meses

    Till_98

    First Of all c6 isnt blockading the best square for the knight on b8 cause in this Queens-Gambit lines its very Bad to Blockade the c7 pawn with a knight on c6. Often this is Blacks only counterattack in the Center. Also there is no Problem for Black in the Exchange Variation because its a well known theoretical Position with chances for both sides.

    3.e6 for Black is called the Semi-Slav. but this is completely Different to the

  • hace 9 meses

    2x-5y

    And what about 3. c4?

  • hace 9 meses

    2x-5y

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • hace 9 meses

    satyag3

    The slav defense is helpful if you do it the right way

  • hace 10 meses

    glsmith

    I believe black should have played n(c5),or better c5 to c4 forcing white to

    move his bishop to inferior position,followed by b5 to b4 which forces

    white to undeveloped his night this pushes white back from the center. 

  • hace 19 meses

    achartt

    I agree with valdasta91 that this and perhaps any defense depends to some degree on knowing who you are playing (at least if you playing someone of comprable skill). I like what Dereque Kelly has to say about this on chessopenings.com especially in regards to the percieved weakness of the pawn to C6 blocking the knight.

  • hace 2 años

    dcremisi

    it is revealing that espite the queens gambit declined having such a drawish and solid and somewhat boring repuation,  the slav defence actually scores the same as the queens gambit declined,  only with 1.9 percent fewer wins for each side and more draws.   so the Slav is the king of draws after all.

  • hace 2 años

    JoeTheV

    Might try it. Looks good and solid, better than the regular Queen's Gambit Declined.

  • hace 2 años

    dirtydog301

    @vp99, it is true that in your line White still has both center pawns while Black has only one, but Black has compensation for that. The first thing to notice is that Black can now freely develop both of his/her bishops without moving another pawn. White still needs to move either his e- or g- pawn in order to develop his light-squared bishop. This means that Black can finish his/her development before White can, and that must be good for Black. Also, if Black choose to, he/she can attack White's d-pawn with the c-pawn. The disadvantage of that, though, is that Black may end up with an isolated d-pawn that will become a target for White to attack.

  • hace 3 años

    vaiuuii

    vp99, most of the times in the queen's gambit the black b8 knight is developed to d7 so that it allows the c6/c5 break as black needs to attack white's strong centre otherwise black will be in serious trouble. Also, the exchange you show in your analyses is bad for white, who has much better moves in that position. If white only wants a draw, only then he will play 3. cxd4.

  • hace 3 años

    NicoloPags

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • hace 3 años

    vp99

    There is one problem in this opening. That is when black does 2...c6, he/she has taken the kight on b8's best spot to move. But it is nessisarry  because if he/she did 2... e6 then white would do this: 

    Now white has lost a semi-center pawn while black has lost a center pawn( read my blog for more information on cneter and semi-center pawns :  http://blog.chess.com/vp99/the-value-of-a-pawn) Othe than that, its a good opening. 

     

     

  • hace 3 años

    pqbc18

    why is Nf3 better than Nc3?

  • hace 3 años

    l1v3rp00lraw3s0m3

    [COMMENT DELETED]

  • hace 3 años

    gokart24

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • hace 3 años

    Davo97

    I'm not terribly highly rated but, would qa4 for white make sense?

  • hace 3 años

    valdasta91

    Has anyone explored games played by masters?  It seems to me that since there seems to be an argument over wether or not black should accept or decline [and I am assuming the pros have played both] what is best must depend on experience:  yours and your opponent's.  Knowing who you are playing would probably be key to success.

  • hace 3 años

    Aquafog

    Might use this
  • hace 3 años

    Aquafog

    nice

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