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Tata Steel 2013 Round 8 - Magnus Leads

  • SonofPearl
  • on 20/01/13 13:15.

tata_logo blue.jpgThe 2013 Tata Steel Chess tournament is taking place from 12-27 January in Wijk Aan Zee in the Netherlands.

This famous annual tournament has three separate single round-robin competitions, the A, B, and C Groups, each featuring 14 players.

The strongest tournament is the A Group and this year features 6 out of the top 10 ranked players; world champion Vishy Anand, world #1 Magnus Carlsen, defending champion Lev Aronian, rising star Fabiano Caruana, world #6 Sergey Karjakin, and US champion Hikaru Nakamura.

Chess.com has live coverage and commentary of round 9 on Tuesday with GM Magesh & The Poet.  See here for the latest details (scroll down the page).

Chess.com coverage starts at 05:30 Pacific, 08:30 Eastern in the US (13:30 UTC).


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Round 8 - Official website report

While a fierce snow storm battered Wijk aan Zee, inside De Moriaan the audience was treated to a quiet round, occasionally upset by blunders that only can be explained in one way: Wijk aan Zee fatigue. The first player to drop a piece was Hou Yifan, who blundered a piece in a worse endgame against Levon Aronian, chasing a perpetual check that didn't exist. Instead of recapturing the e5-pawn, Black played 25...Rxa2? only to realize that after 26.Kb1 Rxf2 27.exd6 Rb7 28.Ka1 the intended 28...Rb6 with the idea Ra6 doesn't work after 29.Rd2.

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Tata 2013 Round 8 Lev Aronian.jpg

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Soon after, several players in Group B joined the blunderfest. Nils Grandelius completely overlooked 13...Ne4? 14.Qxe5! against Predrag Nikolic, but Arkadij Naiditsch topped them all with the inexplicable 21...Bxh5? 22.Bxh5 handing the point to Robin van Kampen on a platter.

Pedrag Nikolic (left) defeated Nils Grandelius in Group B

Tata 2013 Round 8 Nikolic v Grandelius.jpg

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Back in the A-group Anand-Sokolov, Giri-Wang Hao and Leko-Harikrishna ended rapidly in a draw.

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Tata 2013 Round 8 Vishy Anand Ivan Sokolov.jpg

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Tata 2013 Round 8 Anish Giri Wang Hao.jpg

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Tata 2013 Round 8 Peter Leko.jpg

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Fabiano Caruana had an overwhelming position after the opening against Erwin l'Ami, but after several mistakes before the first time control the Italian Grandmaster had to start all over. Which he did successfully, raking in the full point before the second time control.

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Tata 2013 Round 8 Fabiano Caruana Erwin Lami.jpg

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Meanwhile Loek van Wely wasn't so lucky against Hikaru Nakamura. The American Grandmaster again confirmed his status as a “Spartelkoning” (Squirm King), to quote his Dutch opponent, and survived another lost endgame as he did earlier against Sokolov.

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Tata 2013 Round 8 Loek van Wely.jpg

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Today's last man standing was Magnus Carlsen, who again takes the sole lead after defeating Sergey Karjakin in 92 moves. The critical moment occurred at move 67, when Carlsen decided force matters with 67.g4!? hxg4 68.h5. Karjakin fell for the bluff with 68...Rh1?, where he could have a draw after 68...gxh5 69.f5 h4 70.f5 Kg6 71.Rxf8 Kf5! and black will force a perpetual check, for example: 72.Rh8 g3 72.Ke1 g3 74.Kf1 Rb1 75.Kg2 Rb2.

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Tata 2013 Round 8 Magnus Carlsen Sergey Karjakin.jpg

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Group A Standings After 8 Rounds

1 Carlsen, Magnus  NOR  2861 6
2 Anand, Viswanathan  IND  2772
3 Aronian, Levon  ARM  2802 5
4 Nakamura, Hikaru  USA  2769 5
5 Harikrishna, Pentala  IND  2698
6 Karjakin, Sergey  RUS  2780
7 Leko, Peter  HUN  2735 4
8 Caruana, Fabiano  ITA  2781 4
9 Van Wely, Loek  NED  2679
10 Wang, Hao  CHN  2752
11 Giri, Anish  NED  2720 3
12 Sokolov, Ivan  NED  2663
13 L'Ami, Erwin  NED  2627
14 Hou, Yifan  CHN  2603

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In Grandmaster Group B the crowd was delighted to see 61-year-old Jan Timman win for the third time in a row, thus joining Richard Rapport and Sergey Movsesian in the lead at 5½ out of 8. The Dutch living legend outplayed World Junior Champion Alexander Ipatov from a slightly better endgame.

Jan Timman joined the leaders in Group B

Tata 2013 Round 8 Jan Timman.jpg

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Group B Round 8 Results

Van Kampen, Robin  1-0  Naiditsch, Arkadij 
Timman, Jan H  1-0  Ipatov, Alexander 
Nikolic, Predrag  1-0  Grandelius, Nils 
Rapport, Richard  0-1  Smeets, Jan
Edouard, Romain 1-0  Dubov, Daniil
Ernst, Sipke 0-1  Turov, Maxim
Movsesian, Sergei ½-½  Tiviakov, Sergei

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Group B Standings After 8 Rounds

1 Rapport, Richard  HUN  2621
2 Movsesian, Sergei  ARM  2688
3 Timman, Jan H  NED  2566
4 Naiditsch, Arkadij  GER  2708 5
5 Dubov, Daniil  RUS  2600
6 Smeets, Jan  NED  2615
7 Tiviakov, Sergei  NED  2655 4
8 Edouard, Romain  FRA  2686 4
9 Turov, Maxim  RUS  2630 4
10 Van Kampen, Robin  NED  2581
11 Grandelius, Nils  SWE  2572 3
12 Nikolic, Predrag  BIH  2619 3
13 Ipatov, Alexander  TUR  2587 2
14 Ernst, Sipke  NED  2556 2

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Italian Sabino Brunello again caught up with Fernanda Peralta to lead Group C with 6½ out of 8. While Peralta was unable to beat Mark van der Werf, head of the Dutch Chess Federation, Brunello ground down Krikor Mekhitarian's Tarrasch Defence. Local player David Klein is one point behind the leaders after beating Ukraine's Oleg Romanishin. The Dutch International Master now requires a win in round 9 for a GM-norm.

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Group C Round 8 Results

Goryachkina, Aleksandra  1-0  Admiraal, Miguoel 
Klein, David  1-0  Romanishin, Oleg M 
Kovchan, Alexander  ½-½  Burg, Twan 
Peralta, Fernando  ½-½  Van Der Werf, Mark
Swinkels, Robin ½-½  Gretarsson, Hjorvar Steinn
Brunello, Sabino 1-0  Mekhitarian, Krikor Sevag
Schut, Lisa 1-0  Bitensky, Igor

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Group C Standings After 8 Rounds

1 Brunello, Sabino  ITA  2572
2 Peralta, Fernando  ARG  2617
3 Klein, David  NED  2445
4 Swinkels, Robin  NED  2508
5 Kovchan, Alexander  UKR  2579
6 Mekhitarian, Krikor Sevag  BRA  2543 4
7 Gretarsson, Hjorvar Steinn  ISL  2516 4
8 Burg, Twan  NED  2492 4
9 Romanishin, Oleg M  UKR  2521
10 Bitensky, Igor  ISR  2400 3
11 Goryachkina, Aleksandra  RUS  2402 3
12 Van Der Werf, Mark  NED  2450
13 Admiraal, Miguoel  NED  2321
14 Schut, Lisa  NED  2295 2

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Photos from the official website. Videos by Freshmen media. Games via TWIC.

Leído 11492 veces 46 comentarios
4 votos

Comentarios


  • hace 23 meses

    Sukhjinder_Pal

    SerbianChessStar grow up fisrt..u looser

  • hace 23 meses

    kecs

    Go Lékó, go!

  • hace 23 meses

    Jai_CM

    Wow!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!SmileCool

  • hace 23 meses

    jac7

    wow!

  • hace 23 meses

    indian_crown

    @SerbianChessStar.I know you are frustrated that Carlsen is not WC,but tell you what,even if you stand on your head Anand will still be the WC.lolSmile

  • hace 23 meses

    SonofPearl

    @ XavierPadilla I didn't check the variations given in the official report, so there may well be typos.  Looking at it now, I don't really understand it either! Smile

  • hace 23 meses

    OneBigPawn

    Hope vishy takes the win

  • hace 23 meses

    sid3105

    @SerbianChessStar  

     

    "Man this suckhjinder Pal the Indian talking crap about Carlsen.. man Anand is the worst WC in history, he's terrible, why you talking bro?"

     

    Where's Serbia by the way?

  • hace 23 meses

    determinacy

    @Sukhjinder_Paul: The move that you suggest loses by force. Check the position with a computer. 

  • hace 23 meses

    stupid_chess

    Magnus...magnus everywhere!!

  • hace 23 meses

    EternalChess

    btw a 1400 player would have took the pawn, then played Kg8 when f6+ is played, and you would have lost too, so yea you suck.

  • hace 23 meses

    EternalChess

    Man this suckhjinder Pal the Indian talking crap about Carlsen.. man Anand is the worst WC in history, he's terrible, why you talking bro?

    The reason Karjakin was scared was because of f5 f6+ where he would have to play Kg6 Ke5! and sac his bishop, maybe he didnt see the computer moves which forced the perpetual, and instead thought he would lose by losing his bishop so he doesnt play gxh5.

    Man I can't wait until Carlsen crushes Anand in the next WC then we will see your sorry excuses.

  • hace 23 meses

    Vingore

    Carlsen is the greatest player of all time!

  • hace 23 meses

    jesterville

    I just went through the Carlsen game. It seems to me that he is deliberately staying away from theory, and looking to get to "the end game as soon as possible. Playing to his strengths? He did the same thing with "Hari". How does one prepare for such a player?

  • hace 23 meses

    Magnutized

    Sukhinder:

    "In carlsen-Karjakin game even a 1400 player like me would have played 68...gxh5 to get two connected passed pawns...I think its fear of Carlsen that makes GMs blunder on the board."

    There's a good reason why Karjakin didn't play gxh5. It's because of f5, and black faces many nasty threats. However, the engines show that black can actually get away with a perpetual. But this is not easy for a human to see, particularly not for Karjakin who had only minutes left on his clock.

    The purpose of Rh1 was to stop h6+, because the king can't take the pawn (the bishop is hanging). Rh1 may look natural, but it's actually a losing move.

    Before making rather silly comments which imply that Karjakin played weaker than a 1400 ELO rated player, please sit down and at least analyze the game. The endgame is more complicated than it appears to be, and even white has to be careful. Or at least enlighten yourself and watch some of the analyses on YouTube or on the other chess sites.

  • hace 23 meses

    jesterville

    wow...my schedule took me away from chess for two days...and it looks like I have some catching-up to do on this Magnus game...looking forward.

  • hace 23 meses

    XavierPadilla

    @SonofPearl: These must be typo mistakes from the original report:

    "The critical moment occurred at move 67, when Carlsen decided force matters with 67.g4!? hxg4 68.h5. Karjakin fell for the bluff with 68...Rh1?, where he could have a draw after 68...gxh5 69.f5 h4 70.f5 Kg6 71.Rxf8 Kf5!..."

    Must read 70.f6+, I think.

    The following I just can not understand:

    "...and black will force a perpetual check, for example: 72.Rh8 g3 72.Ke1 g3 74.Kf1 Rb1 75.Kg2 Rb2".

    Pawn moves twice from g4 to g3 (delivering check the first time), then White king moves into check (Black rook is on b1) also twice...

    Somebody clarify, please.

  • hace 23 meses

    leendertthebest

    beautifull games

  • hace 23 meses

    deepak64

    All games are very nice.

  • hace 23 meses

    Sukhjinder_Pal

    @forrie i am talking about that particular position...and yes if I was in that position I would have definitely played 68...gxh5 irrespective of my opponent's strength

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