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Nelson Mandela - The (Small) Chess Connection

  • PeterDoggers
  • on 06/12/13 13:47.

Today the world stood still for a moment, mourning the death of one of the true greats of recent history. It was one man who dominated the newspapers, websites and tv programs: Nelson Mandela. The South African leader, who passed away on December 5th at the age of 95, was one of the greatest leaders of the 20th century. There's a chess connection, albeit a small one.

In June 2010 the New York Times reported that... 

[d]uring a state visit to Britain in March, President Jacob Zuma of South Africa went to Buckingham Palace, where there was an exhibition of items from his country. During the tour, Queen Elizabeth II showed President Zuma a chess set that Nelson Mandela gave her in 1996. The pieces appear to be African tribesman.

Kevin Spraggett has more on this chess set.

So... Mandela did play chess. Before we get to that, here's Jonathan Rowson in his chess column of today speculating about what kind of player he would have been:

When I think of what Mandela’s story has to offer the chess player, I would say patience, because he was in jail for a long time; courage, because he had to believe in himself and his ideas when the position was hostile to both; and imagination, because he had to see several moves ahead to a position with new rules and pieces with new powers, and still believe he could keep control.

America's National Public Radio (NPR)  referred to an interview with Ahmed Kathrada, one of Mandela's closest confidants inside and later outside prison. In the interview, with Radio Diaries in 2004, Kathrada recalled Mandela playing a chess game for three days against a young medical student who had recently been incarcerated on the island.

"They played the first day, and when it came to lockup time, the game had not finished because Mandela calculates every move as he does in politics," Kathrada said.

Mandela persuaded one of the guards to lock the board away in an empty cell. At the end of the next day, the game was still not finished and the guard had to lock it away again.

"In the end, this young chap just gave up. He said, 'You win. I can't carry on this way,' " Kathrada said. "That's Mandela; it's a war of attrition and he won."

America's Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) published an interview with Neville Alexander, also a political activist and half Mandela's age when he arrived on Robben Island in 1964, the same year as Mandela. He was imprisoned there for ten years (Mandel for 27 years). When the interviewer asked "Tell me about how Mandela played chess," the answer was:

Well, chess and draughts were the two games which were the oldest on the island in a way. Draughts partly because we could play them without a board. Chess, eventually, when we did get a board. It became a favorite game, and he was one of those who knew the game quite well. My personal recollection is that in both draughts and chess Nelson's attitude was that of really attrition. That was his stance. He would take his time with every move, he would consider it very carefully. He would sort of mislead the other person by pointing things, this way, that way, the other and then making the move that wasn't expected and so on. But more than that, when he did make a really good move, then he would really crow and make the other person feel really small. I recall this particularly because of our late comrade, Don Davis, who eventually also joined the ANC incidentally. Don Davis used to think he was a really good draughts player, and Nelson and Andrew Mlangeni were his only two rivals ... He normally beat Nelson, but he tended not to beat Mlangeni. Mlangeni was very good. But the point is that Nelson would ... torture Don, that Don would sometimes just throw the board in the air, with pieces flying all over the place, getting really irritated. But [Mandela] had that way of, as I say, it was a war of attrition, and he tended therefore to be victorious in most cases.

Interviewer: He was excruciatingly slow in getting around to making his moves ...

Ja, it was deliberate you see. This is a point that with Nelson, again, you can't always be 100% sure, but it was largely deliberate because he knew that psychologically he was getting at the other person. By the way, I never played chess or draughts with them, because I just don't know the game well enough.

In our report on this year's Commonwealth Championship, which was posted on Mandela's 95th birthday, we wrote that among the prominent guests of the tournament were 13th World Champion Garry Kasparov but also Jacob Zuma, the South African President who attended the closing ceremony.

Zuma, who also spent ten years on Robben Island, said in his speech at the end of the tournament:

On Robben Island, chess provided a solace to us that we needed in those conditions of isolation and deprivation. It propelled our minds beyond the confines of the prison walls and allowed us to reflect and to position our thoughts strategically to fight the regime. (...) Many comrades made chess sets out of soap and driftwood that allowed us to continue to play this noble and great game. We improvised with makeshift chess boards and we enjoyed the fullness of the game.

Mandela's jail cell on Robben Island | Photo © Mike Klein
View from Robben Island back to Cape Town | Photo © Mike Klein
View from Robben Island back to Cape Town | Photo © Mike Klein

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  • hace 8 meses

    kamalakanta

    The fact that racist students defamed Mandela does not make their defamations true.

  • hace 8 meses

    learningcoach

    Nelson Mandela - Biographical

    What did Nelson Mandela mean to you? Share your thoughts!

    Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was born in Transkei, South Africa on July 18, 1918. His father was Hendry Mphakanyiswa of the Tembu Tribe. Mandela himself was educated at University College of Fort Hare and the University of Witwatersrand where he studied law. He joined the African National Congress in 1944 and was engaged in resistance against the ruling National Party's apartheid policies after 1948. He went on trial for treason in 1956-1961 and was acquitted in 1961.

    After the banning of the ANC in 1960, Nelson Mandela argued for the setting up of a military wing within the ANC. In June 1961, the ANC executive considered his proposal on the use of violent tactics and agreed that those members who wished to involve themselves in Mandela's campaign would not be stopped from doing so by the ANC. This led to the formation of Umkhonto we Sizwe. Mandela was arrested in 1962 and sentenced to five years' imprisonment with hard labour. In 1963, when many fellow leaders of the ANC and the Umkhonto we Sizwe were arrested, Mandela was brought to stand trial with them for plotting to overthrow the government by violence. His statement from the dock received considerable international publicity. On June 12, 1964, eight of the accused, including Mandela, were sentenced to life imprisonment. From 1964 to 1982, he was incarcerated at Robben Island Prison, off Cape Town; thereafter, he was at Pollsmoor Prison, nearby on the mainland.

    During his years in prison, Nelson Mandela's reputation grew steadily. He was widely accepted as the most significant black leader in South Africa and became a potent symbol of resistance as the anti-apartheid movement gathered strength. He consistently refused to compromise his political position to obtain his freedom.

    Nelson Mandela was released on February 11, 1990. After his release, he plunged himself wholeheartedly into his life's work, striving to attain the goals he and others had set out almost four decades earlier. In 1991, at the first national conference of the ANC held inside South Africa after the organization had been banned in 1960, Mandela was elected President of the ANC while his lifelong friend and colleague, Oliver Tambo, became the organisation's National Chairperson.

    From Les Prix Nobel. The Nobel Prizes 1993, Editor Tore Frängsmyr, [Nobel Foundation], Stockholm, 1994

    This autobiography/biography was written at the time of the award and later published in the book series Les Prix Nobel/Nobel Lectures. The information is sometimes updated with an addendum submitted by the Laureate.

     

    Short Clip

    Watch a video clip of Nelson Mandela and Frederik Willem de Klerk receiving their Nobel Peace Prize medals and diplomas during the Nobel Peace Prize Award Ceremony at the Oslo City Hall in Norway, 10 December 1993.

    Watch the Documentary
    Norwegian 1 min.
  • hace 8 meses

    learningcoach

    Nelson Mandela - Biographical

    What did Nelson Mandela mean to you? Share your thoughts!

    Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was born in Transkei, South Africa on July 18, 1918. His father was Hendry Mphakanyiswa of the Tembu Tribe. Mandela himself was educated at University College of Fort Hare and the University of Witwatersrand where he studied law. He joined the African National Congress in 1944 and was engaged in resistance against the ruling National Party's apartheid policies after 1948. He went on trial for treason in 1956-1961 and was acquitted in 1961.

    After the banning of the ANC in 1960, Nelson Mandela argued for the setting up of a military wing within the ANC. In June 1961, the ANC executive considered his proposal on the use of violent tactics and agreed that those members who wished to involve themselves in Mandela's campaign would not be stopped from doing so by the ANC. This led to the formation of Umkhonto we Sizwe. Mandela was arrested in 1962 and sentenced to five years' imprisonment with hard labour. In 1963, when many fellow leaders of the ANC and the Umkhonto we Sizwe were arrested, Mandela was brought to stand trial with them for plotting to overthrow the government by violence. His statement from the dock received considerable international publicity. On June 12, 1964, eight of the accused, including Mandela, were sentenced to life imprisonment. From 1964 to 1982, he was incarcerated at Robben Island Prison, off Cape Town; thereafter, he was at Pollsmoor Prison, nearby on the mainland.

    During his years in prison, Nelson Mandela's reputation grew steadily. He was widely accepted as the most significant black leader in South Africa and became a potent symbol of resistance as the anti-apartheid movement gathered strength. He consistently refused to compromise his political position to obtain his freedom.

    Nelson Mandela was released on February 11, 1990. After his release, he plunged himself wholeheartedly into his life's work, striving to attain the goals he and others had set out almost four decades earlier. In 1991, at the first national conference of the ANC held inside South Africa after the organization had been banned in 1960, Mandela was elected President of the ANC while his lifelong friend and colleague, Oliver Tambo, became the organisation's National Chairperson.

    From Les Prix Nobel. The Nobel Prizes 1993, Editor Tore Frängsmyr, [Nobel Foundation], Stockholm, 1994

    This autobiography/biography was written at the time of the award and later published in the book series Les Prix Nobel/Nobel Lectures. The information is sometimes updated with an addendum submitted by the Laureate.

     

    Short Clip

    Watch a video clip of Nelson Mandela and Frederik Willem de Klerk receiving their Nobel Peace Prize medals and diplomas during the Nobel Peace Prize Award Ceremony at the Oslo City Hall in Norway, 10 December 1993.

    Watch the Documentary
    Norwegian 1 min.
  • hace 8 meses

    learningcoach

    Nelson Mandela - Biographical

    What did Nelson Mandela mean to you? Share your thoughts!

    Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was born in Transkei, South Africa on July 18, 1918. His father was Hendry Mphakanyiswa of the Tembu Tribe. Mandela himself was educated at University College of Fort Hare and the University of Witwatersrand where he studied law. He joined the African National Congress in 1944 and was engaged in resistance against the ruling National Party's apartheid policies after 1948. He went on trial for treason in 1956-1961 and was acquitted in 1961.

    After the banning of the ANC in 1960, Nelson Mandela argued for the setting up of a military wing within the ANC. In June 1961, the ANC executive considered his proposal on the use of violent tactics and agreed that those members who wished to involve themselves in Mandela's campaign would not be stopped from doing so by the ANC. This led to the formation of Umkhonto we Sizwe. Mandela was arrested in 1962 and sentenced to five years' imprisonment with hard labour. In 1963, when many fellow leaders of the ANC and the Umkhonto we Sizwe were arrested, Mandela was brought to stand trial with them for plotting to overthrow the government by violence. His statement from the dock received considerable international publicity. On June 12, 1964, eight of the accused, including Mandela, were sentenced to life imprisonment. From 1964 to 1982, he was incarcerated at Robben Island Prison, off Cape Town; thereafter, he was at Pollsmoor Prison, nearby on the mainland.

    During his years in prison, Nelson Mandela's reputation grew steadily. He was widely accepted as the most significant black leader in South Africa and became a potent symbol of resistance as the anti-apartheid movement gathered strength. He consistently refused to compromise his political position to obtain his freedom.

    Nelson Mandela was released on February 11, 1990. After his release, he plunged himself wholeheartedly into his life's work, striving to attain the goals he and others had set out almost four decades earlier. In 1991, at the first national conference of the ANC held inside South Africa after the organization had been banned in 1960, Mandela was elected President of the ANC while his lifelong friend and colleague, Oliver Tambo, became the organisation's National Chairperson.

    From Les Prix Nobel. The Nobel Prizes 1993, Editor Tore Frängsmyr, [Nobel Foundation], Stockholm, 1994

    This autobiography/biography was written at the time of the award and later published in the book series Les Prix Nobel/Nobel Lectures. The information is sometimes updated with an addendum submitted by the Laureate.

     

    Short Clip

    Watch a video clip of Nelson Mandela and Frederik Willem de Klerk receiving their Nobel Peace Prize medals and diplomas during the Nobel Peace Prize Award Ceremony at the Oslo City Hall in Norway, 10 December 1993.

    Watch the Documentary
    Norwegian 1 min.
  • hace 8 meses

    kamalakanta

    A wonderful video featuring Francois Pienaar, captain of the rugby team which won the World Cup in 1995.... beautiful words from someone who knew Mandela, whom he calls by his tribal name, Madiba, personally. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMMrhZzp3Mw

  • hace 8 meses

    volencho

    R.I.PCryCry

  • hace 8 meses

    negotiate

    there is quite a lot of racism alive and well today. what can we do, educate racists? that is futile as they worship ignorance. when your back is against the wall you do what you can. god bless el patron of south africa mandela

  • hace 8 meses

    pmcglothin

    I think you have written a marvelous piece -- making it relevant to the chess community, while drawing attention the accomplishments of a great leader. Well done!

  • hace 8 meses

    drumdaddy

    Peace to all! End slavery in our lifetimes!

  • hace 8 meses

    Vladimurr

    I can't say I have much empathy for human beings. As Hume used to say, the evil of mankind should be apparent to any student of history.

    I'd rather have some real chess news and couldn't care less whether Nelson wore G-Star briefs or rooted for Arsenal...

  • hace 8 meses

    LaeveldLeeu

    A moment of silence is the expression for a period of silent contemplation, prayer and reflection. Similar to flying a flag at half-mast, a moment of silence is a gesture of respect, particularly in mourning for those who have died recently or as part of a tragic historical event.

    Only witches, (cute or not), are obviously from a sphere where skins of infinitesimal thicknesses are common.

  • hace 8 meses

    Vladimurr

    Now Peter it's no use waiting for the Pulitzer for the good reason that an emo piece on Mandela written with all the verve of a regular highschool student just won't cut it.

    So if you could go on and start getting the news underway that would be great. I can't believe there was nothing to write about for more than two days...

  • hace 8 meses

    LaeveldLeeu

    Nelson Mandela referred to Che as: "An inspiration for every human being who loves freedom" Others viewed Che Guevaraas the spokesman of a failing ideology and a ruthless executioner who did not afford others a proper legal process.

    Often in life as you get older you get wiser. Some people live during more confrontational stages of life than others. What makes Nelson great is that he sided with the revolutionaries when he was young and when he had control changed their minds to forgive.

    In so doing he prevented a civil war. He went from there and managed to cleverly unite different races and cultures together as a single nation in a remarkable short time. 

    That makes him different and very special.

    Bayete.


  • hace 8 meses

    Tacticos

    A well written article about one of humanitys greatest.

  • hace 8 meses

    supriya-guru

    Thanks for a good article...

  • hace 8 meses

    slvnfernando

    Well, with no disrespect to Mandela, I think Mahathma Gandhi and Mother Theresa will prefer not to be in the same VIP room in heaven with him,  Kenji_Yamasaki!!

  • hace 8 meses

    Pawnpusher3

    May he Rest in Peace forever. 

  • hace 8 meses

    chessdoggblack

    @blackbox333, MrSkull & others: Closing rebuttal in defence of Nelson Mandela. If you were oppressed, rejected, disrespected, neglected and branded an outcast people because of your race color, religion or any other reason for being a human being not of the oppressor race or political views, what would you do to free yourself? Would you become a human coward or a brave human? Please be honest with yourself. "One person terrorist is another person freedom fighter. It is better to die than be oppressed by any atrocious, humiliating negative human act...as that of APARTHEID: where-so-ever it raises its ugly head." Even the creators of apartheid fully understood that oppression would never last forever. Sealed

  • hace 8 meses

    chess4alekhine

    Jesus said:

    Happy are the peace makers, for their treasures are in heaven...

     

    R.I.P

  • hace 8 meses

    carenevo

    You will never die.

    R.I.P

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