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Candidates Tournament Round 13

  • SonofPearl
  • on 31/03/13 13:09.

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There was a very tense atmosphere in round 13 of the London Candidates Tournament - the penultimate day of the competition.  Both Vladimir Kramnik and Magnus Carlsen were absolutely determined to win their games against Boris Gelfand and Teimour Radjabov respectively. 
Vladimir Kramnik had the advantage of the white pieces and played the novel idea 5.e3 in a fianchetto Gruenfeld sideline, putting Gelfand under great pressure and eventually winning a pawn.  But Gelfand was tenacious in defence, finding the crucial move 38...Rd8 as the time control approached to save the game.
A relaxed Boris Gelfand before the game
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Kramnik pressed hard, but Gelfand was equal to the task
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Magnus Carlsen had the black pieces against Teimour Radjabov, and opted for the Nimzo-Indian after Radjabov played 1.d4.  Radjabov slowly drifted into a slightly worse endgame, and Carlsen kept trying everything he could to keep the game alive and induce a mistake from his opponent.  Deep into the 6th hour of the game Radjabov was surviving almost solely on the 30 second time increment and Carlsen picked up a vital pawn.  Finally, incredibly, after nearly 7 hours of play Carlsen won the game!
Magnus Carlsen won an amazingly tense game
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Teimour Radjabov finally succumbed to Magnus Carlsen after nearly 7 hours
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The first game to finish today was the encounter between Peter Svidler and Vassily Ivanchuk. The spinning roulette wheel that seems to determine Chucky's choice of opening in this tournament stopped today at the French Defence. Svidler obtained a pleasant game with the advance variation and as Ivanchuk struggled to cope with his inferior position he lost on time for the fifth time in the tournament.
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Peter Svidler did what Magnus Carlsen couldn't - beating Vassily Ivanchuk
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Despite his loss to Vladimir Kramnik yesterday, Lev Aronian still had a mathematical chance of winning the tournament, but even that minuscule possibility vanished when he only drew with Alexander Grischuk, in the second game to finish today. 

Alexander Grischuk and Lev Aronian drew their game

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So Magnus Carlsen and Vladimir Kramnik both have a score of 8½/13 going into the final round tomorrow.  But Carlsen has the superior tie-break score, so as long as he achieves at least the same result as Kramnik he will win the tournament.  Carlsen has white against Svidler, and Kramnik has black against Ivanchuk.

The standings after 13 rounds

Name Fed Elo Pts
Magnus Carlsen NOR 2872
Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2810
Peter Svidler RUS 2747 7
Levon Aronian ARM 2809 7
Boris Gelfand ISR 2740 6
Alexander Grischuk RUS 2764 6
Vassily Ivanchuk UKR 2757 5
Teimour Radjabov AZE 2793 4

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The 2013 Candidates Tournament runs from 14 March - 2 April in London, with the winner earning the right to challenge current world champion Vishy Anand for the title.

The tournament is an 8-player double round-robin event and the venue is The IET at 2 Savoy Place on the banks of the river Thames. The total prize fund is €510,000 (approx 665,000 USD). 

All rounds start at 14:00 GMT, and the time control is 2 hours for 40 moves, then an extra hour added for the next 20 moves, then 15 minutes more with a 30 second increment to finish.

The official FIDE website coverage is at london2013.fide.com.

Round-by-Round Pairings

Round 1  15/03/13   
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Round 2  16/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Teimour Radjabov  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Round 3  17/03/13   
Boris Gelfand 0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vassily Ivanchuk  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Round 4  19/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Alexander Grischuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 5  20/03/13   
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Round 6  21/03/13   
Peter Svidler  0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Round 7  23/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Round 8  24/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Boris Gelfand
Alexander Grischuk  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Vladimir Kramnik 1 - 0 Peter Svidler 
Round 9  25/03/13  
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Vassily Ivanchuk  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Boris Gelfand 1 - 0 Levon Aronian
Round 10  27/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Alexander Grischuk  0 - 1 Vladimir Kramnik
Round 11  28/03/13  
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik 1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Levon Aronian
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Round 12  29/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen 0 - 1 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Levon Aronian 0 - 1 Vladimir Kramnik
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Round 13  31/03/13  
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 14  01/04/13
Magnus Carlsen Peter Svidler 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Vladimir Kramnik
Boris Gelfand Alexander Grischuk 
Levon Aronian Teimour Radjabov 

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Look out for details of Chess.com TV coverage of the event at this page.

Pictures by Ray Morris-Hill.

Leído 23179 veces 153 comentarios
16 votos

Comentarios


  • hace 20 meses

    Lat3ne

    IVANCHUK THE NOBLE!!

    I,m watching him right now,how he is destroying Kramnik!!

  • hace 20 meses

    mosh_viteza

    I hope Ivanchuck beats Kramnik today..To beat the leaders of this turnament it will be great achievement for him.Chuky it will be like.."You pour losers.." lol

  • hace 20 meses

    mosh_viteza

    There are a lot of examples and this is a good strategie with a better oponent.Prepare an opening with less variations and look with the chess program in all of them.You can even look at worst variations to search for hidden tactics or better positions.In case that your opponent doesnt play acuratly you can "punish" him :)

  • hace 20 meses

    chessrook1234

    mosh_viteza : lol. how many GMs are losing like that? you are kidding. Upsets are few in chess if you look at ratings +-200; unless you are playing chucky of course  ;-)

  • hace 20 meses

    mosh_viteza

    A convincing performance doesnt mean to beat anybody .Carlsen have to deal with the best in the world here,and chess changed a lot this days.Anybody can play  good chess with a modern chess engine preparation of the opening.You can evan catch a GM in some unknow variation and win the game

  • hace 20 meses

    chessrook1234

    Tripathi7 for a player currently ranked #4 in the world (almost 2800), a4 was throwing the game ;-) was it intentional?? ;-)) kramnik wants to know.

  • hace 20 meses

    chessrook1234

    Baldvin...from cold iceland.....Wake up ..Many here have commented that they expected a Fisher like perfomance from Carlsen..and have been disappointed. Expectation was Carlsen would squash (all) the competition..but we are on the last day and he hasnt "closed" the deal ;-)

  • hace 20 meses

    dukof

    blunder?  Not only does your opponent blunder, but you also avoided making them.

    After 7 hours of play in the 13th round. Carlsen didn't sleep the night before, couldn't calculate as he use to, probably felt like a zombie. Still determined enough to keep his head on track to pull off the marginal positional edge and put time-pressure on his opponent to trigger a mistake. I think for him personally it's one of the best wins of his life, even if not technically, to come back like that.

  • hace 20 meses

    sunny9000

    Many endgame chess books tell us you need techniques and precision to draw a drawn endgame. And I did see lot of examples in these books featuring famous players grinded to win drawn positions. And if you were following the official live video commentary, you should notice the GM commentator (sorry forgot his name) said something like "Carlsen and Radjabov's endgame is theoretically drawn, but there is still a lot of play." and "it's a drawn endgame, but it is not as drawish as Kramnik/Gelfend's one." Actually we even have 2 terminologies "a drawn endgame" and "a dead draw".

  • hace 20 meses

    Baldvin

    ThemagicianPaul: "I feel sorry for Carlsen's opponents who play drawn endgames for 6-8 hours and then finally blunder because they're too exhausted to correctly respond to cheap endgame tricks.."

    When you write things like this you reveal your complete ignorance regarding chess.

  • hace 20 meses

    Baldvin

    chessrook1234: "Hope Kramnik wins the tourney tomorrow.....Magnus was only so-so here...he should have far more wins based on his rating."


    That's complete bullshit.

  • hace 20 meses

    drumdaddy

    I'm a huge fan of champion Anand, a true world ambassador for chess and one of the strongest players of all time.

    I'm a huge fan of Vladimir Kramnik, a true world ambassador for chess and one of the strongest players of all time.

    I'm a huge fan of Magnus Carlsen, a true world ambassador for chess and one of the strongest players of all time.

    For this old chess fan, it was never better than this! 

  • hace 20 meses

    fleiman

    In the past a world champion was the best player. The Chess Power is measured by Rating. As known,Carsen  has  the highest Rating.

    So, I think it's just logic if the strongest Chess player will be a World Champion.

  • hace 20 meses

    Chesspanzer

    Here's by point: I don't care for anything about Carlsen. To me he's a media"s spoiled brat. I'am not interested in his elo or chess games...frankly I don't study them. I study Fischer and Anand. I am and will always be an Anand fan...win,lose or draw its simple as that. I don't care for Carlsen, I don't care for the hype and what they put up on Anand because he is an Indian...you get the message. Anand is a God sent...to let you Europeans know that he is the one who gives out the thinking abilities not you. And if you don't like that kiss me where the sun don't shine. Moreover, chess was created in India.

     

    IMO, the best ever game in the history of Chess was Carlsen's over Anand's at Bilbao but typical of you to have bias.

  • hace 20 meses

    Makholm

    have to say that i'm surprised by svidlers play in the second half ... he came from a largely average place in the middle, and up where he have realistic chances of snatching the 3'd place in front of Aronian

  • hace 20 meses

    MikyZ

    I share zx81s point if view and I am really amazed by the players fighting spirit. Not only Carlsen who has still a goal to achieve but also f.i. Gelfand and espacially Ivanchuk who battle down Carlsen in a 7 seven hour battle wihtout any chances left in this tounament.

     

    Anyway Carlsen shows his strength as a chess player also by his determination to win.

  • hace 20 meses

    sixtyfoursquares

    If Carlsen WINS this Tournament through a tie-break; then it WILL NOT be a convincing WIN.  The World expected a little bit more than this from Carlsen; for sure!

    Then he will have to face Vishy Anand - known as Tiger of Madras (now Chennai) for the World Chess Championship crown - which will be like catching the tiger by the tail...which will surely NOT be a walk in the park for Carlsen; even though he may be the HIGHEST rated player in this world!! 

    We all are sure to enjoy the treat of great Chess games; in times to come...

  • hace 20 meses

    rubenshein

    My bet for tournament win was Carlsen, but this much must be said: we must all be thoroughly impressed by Gelfands incredibly tough play against Kramnik! Kramnik shied away, terrified by Gelfands ferocious and cunning play. 

    But ditto can not be said of Ivanchuk, losing so many games per time! What a disgrace. Yes, embarassing, almost. A super GM not able to handle his time control is truly a farce. Carlsen must, therefore, play for a win today; chances are big that Ivanchuk will mess up big time yet again. 

    A great tournament it has been. Lots of thrills and drama. 

  • hace 20 meses

    Turtlekrieg

    I'm cheering for Kramnik, but don't understand all the hating on Carlsen. What more does the guy need to do to get respect?

  • hace 20 meses

    AdityaRavuri

    Why do you people hate on carlsen?! By far, he's the strongest player out there (my opinion, sorry vishy) and the youngest; I'm sure most people would agree with me if I said that he's the youngest player to have come THIS far... Being No.1 one tied with Kramnik is not any small thing of someone aged 22....

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