Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Candidates Tournament Round 12

  • SonofPearl
  • on 29/03/13 14:06.

Annotations by GM Sam Shankland
phpJYSOwA.jpeg

The drama reached fever-pitch in round 12 of the London Candidates Tournament today, as the event neared its final stages. It was a fantastic round where the result of the two crucial games was unclear until the very end.

After yesterday's 11th round Vladimir Kramnik claimed he would be happy to draw his vital game with Lev Aronian today with the black pieces. Yet when he played the bold anti-positional 10...f5 it was clear that he was targeting more than half a point!

Aronian found himself under great pressure and Kramnik grabbed a winning advantage with the beautiful 25...Be4. It seemed to be all over, but somehow Kramnik allowed Aronian back into the game and at the first time control computer analysis had it dead level.  However, the position wasn't so easy for tired carbon based life-forms near the end of a tournament after hours of hard-fought play. Aronian was unable to distract Kramnik's bishop with his extra pawns and Kramnik won the game!

Vladimir Kramnik won an amazing game against Aronian

phpEzXTCH.jpeg

.

Lev Aronian was outplayed by Kramnik and missed his drawing chance

php8O1IDA.jpeg

.

.

The other crucial game was Magnus Carlsen's encounter with the unpredictable Vassily Ivanchuk. This time Chucky played a mainline defense, the Sicilian Taimanov, and when Carlsen spent fully 20 minutes thinking about his 13th move Bd4, it was clear something had already gone badly wrong for the tournament leader.

Carlsen has a great record against Ivanchuk and had already managed to save some difficult positions in the tournament, but this time it was too much to ask. Ivanchuk brought home the full point after 7 gruelling hours for a shock win which gives the tournament lead to Kramnik. "I think I played absolutely disgracefully from move one" said an obviously gutted Carlsen at the press conference.

.

Magnus Carlsen...where did it all go wrong?

phpKh9c4Y.jpeg

.

.

The game between Boris Gelfand and Peter Svidler was the first to finish, and after a balanced struggle a draw was agreed once the first time control was reached.

.

Boris Gelfand and Peter Svidler drew their game

phpKpm7y2.jpeg

.

.

The game between Teimour Radjabov and Alexander Grischuk was another long struggle. Radjabov held an endgame advantage but was unable to convert a rook plus f and h pawn against rook ending, and the game ended in a draw.

.

Teimour Radjabov and Alexander Grischuk

phpfMKcPA.jpeg

.

.

Tomorrow is a rest day, so the penultimate round is on Sunday, and the final round Monday. The UK also moves onto BST (British Summer Time), so games will start at 13:00 GMT (14:00 BST).

.

The standings after 12 rounds

Name Fed Elo Pts
Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2810 8
Magnus Carlsen NOR 2872
Levon Aronian ARM 2809
Peter Svidler RUS 2747 6
Boris Gelfand ISR 2740
Alexander Grischuk RUS 2764
Vassily Ivanchuk UKR 2757 5
Teimour Radjabov AZE 2793 4

.


.

The 2013 Candidates Tournament runs from 14 March - 2 April in London, with the winner earning the right to challenge current world champion Vishy Anand for the title.

The tournament is an 8-player double round-robin event and the venue is The IET at 2 Savoy Place on the banks of the river Thames. The total prize fund is €510,000 (approx 665,000 USD). 

All rounds start at 14:00 GMT, and the time control is 2 hours for 40 moves, then an extra hour added for the next 20 moves, then 15 minutes more with a 30 second increment to finish.

The official FIDE website coverage is at london2013.fide.com.

Round-by-Round Pairings

Round 1  15/03/13   
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Round 2  16/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Teimour Radjabov  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Round 3  17/03/13   
Boris Gelfand 0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vassily Ivanchuk  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Round 4  19/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Alexander Grischuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 5  20/03/13   
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Round 6  21/03/13   
Peter Svidler  0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Round 7  23/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Round 8  24/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Boris Gelfand
Alexander Grischuk  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Vladimir Kramnik 1 - 0 Peter Svidler 
Round 9  25/03/13  
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Vassily Ivanchuk  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Boris Gelfand 1 - 0 Levon Aronian
Round 10  27/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Alexander Grischuk  0 - 1 Vladimir Kramnik
Round 11  28/03/13  
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik 1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Levon Aronian
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Round 12  29/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen 0 - 1 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Levon Aronian 0 - 1 Vladimir Kramnik
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Round 13  31/03/13  
Teimour Radjabov  Magnus Carlsen
Alexander Grischuk  Levon Aronian
Vladimir Kramnik Boris Gelfand
Peter Svidler  Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 14  01/04/13
Magnus Carlsen Peter Svidler 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Vladimir Kramnik
Boris Gelfand Alexander Grischuk 
Levon Aronian Teimour Radjabov 

.

Look out for details of Chess.com TV coverage of the event at this page.

Pictures by Ray Morris-Hill.

Leído 31839 veces 316 comentarios
11 votos

Comentarios


  • hace 18 meses

    Lat3ne

    Many people don´t  like Kramnik´s play but the fact is that he upgraded his master Kasparov and he proofs that by beating him in 2000!The only chess player who beats him(in man to man match),so far,was Anand!That,s why he is on the top of the border right now!Like it or not.

  • hace 18 meses

    Vingore

    I almost can't believe that Carlsen actually lost a game!  Incredible bummer!

    Life is not fair.

  • hace 18 meses

    Lat3ne

    This is for those who still think that Kramnik beats Ivanchuk on time!Round 6 Kramnik vs Ivanchuk- draw!

    The next game to finish was the clash between Vladimir Kramnik and Vassily Ivanchuk.  Kramnik was still looking for his first win after Lev Aronian miraculously slipped through his fingers yesterday, and with Ivanchuk once again burning a lot of time on the clock early in the game it looked good for the Russian.

     

    Kramnik took advantage of Ivanchuk's time trouble by launching a direct sacrificial attack on his king.  But a rook down, Kramnik couldn't find a knockout blow for his attack and decided to repeat moves, despite Ivanchuk having just 1 minute left and 10 moves still to play before the first time control! 

    Kramnik explained in the post match press conference, "If Vassily had 5 seconds left, then I would continue, but with one minute...", and joked,"Players are not blundering pieces to me!

  • hace 18 meses

    stupid_chess

    im with u, go magnus!

  • hace 18 meses

    invictuschessmaster

    @leecooper78 is making some big allegation based on what?

  • hace 18 meses

    sittingpawn

    SerbianChessStar   "if you're no(sic) allowed to say 'I played like ****' then go move to another country where free speech is not allowed."

    Serbian, free speech is not the ability to say what you want without consequence or judgement, it is the ability to say what you want without prosecution by the government. Free speech does not however give you permission to act rude or obnoxious and not get called out on it.

    With that said, Carlsen was obviously upset that he lost (he's not used to it after all) and was just venting. Ivanchuk played a great game because he capitalized on Carlsen's miscues and unlike a few other people in this tournament was able to hold the advantages that Carlsen gave him. I have not read the full transcript of Carlsen's comments so I have no idea if he did give credit to Ivanchuk or not, and if he did not then it was rude. It's always just good etiquette when you call out your own bad play to give credit to your opponent for their good play.

     

     

  • hace 18 meses

    ErwinSachs

    Undoubtedly Carlsen is the best thing to hit top flight chess over recent years....so many of the players even say this.

    At 22, he has all the time on his side and for sure many World Championship titles.......What a great game Kramnik Ivanchuk, certainly makes the last 2 rounds all the more exciting.

  • hace 18 meses

    Andre_Harding

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • hace 18 meses

    duniel

    @ttukhun: You are right. I know that chessplayers are no different from other people but I was still thinking that there might be some adverse selection going on:)

    @chessdoggblack, @Andre_Harding: Very nicely said!

  • hace 18 meses

    Aquinas65

    duniel and ttukhun: Thank you. Your comments restore some of my faith in mankind.

  • hace 18 meses

    Incrense

    The tournment format is better, but they should make a rule that each country can only send 1 participant. We are not seeing 6 Brazil team in FIFA World Cups

  • hace 18 meses

    ttukhun

    duniel, personal response to you: I somehow identify with your post. After I fell in love with Chess (that's how it feels) it was a bit depressing to enter the Internet forums and find the same demons as everywhere else. The wish to bite, the hatred, contempt, envy... There's no such a thing as a chess community. Amongst those interested in chess you can find the whole spectrum of humans, every color, shape and odor. And that's good, because Chess is as large as life. Just in case it resonates to you, I'm trying to become less judgemental, learn to laugh more about the world's idiocy, run away from toxic people and nourish the friendships that are worthy. Best regards. 

  • hace 18 meses

    melvinbluestone

    I like Carlsen, but, surprise! he's not invincible! And how strange he should lose, with white, mind you, against the craziest guy in the tournament. And I mean crazy as a compliment. What was it Bogart said when he thought a tiger had eaten Tim Holt? ....... "Done as if by order!"

  • hace 18 meses

    golden_time

    Come on people, its only 1/2 point tournement with two games remaining, this is not done yet, and actualy this good for the young Carlsen, he has to learn that if he wants to get up there, he has to make a real commitment on each and every game, and the most important thing is that his chess is the best in the world and its only about discipline and commitment, i think the day off came at the right time and chances are good for a tie-break match between Kramnik and Carlsen.

  • hace 18 meses

    chess25836

    @ chessdoggblack i totally agree with u

  • hace 18 meses

    Andre_Harding

    @chessdoggblack: Well said!!

  • hace 18 meses

    Andre_Harding

    Some of these comments are unbelievable. But what should I expect after "Wonderboy" loses?

    People complaining about the tournament format need to acknowledge that CARLSEN WANTED A CANDIDATES TOURNAMENT and FIDE GAVE IT TO HIM.

    I don't want to hear any excuses now. Every top player I can recall being interviewed thought it was (at the very least) "strange" that Carlsen didn't compete in the Candidates Matches last year (J.Polgar, Gelfand, Kasparov, Karpov, and I'm sure others too). As someone said many pages ago, take all of your chances to become the Champion, if indeed it is that important to you. Or maybe it's more important to avoid the matches but shout "hey, I'm #1"...

    Carlsen wins most of the supertournaments he enters, and yet he may not win the Candidates Tournament! THIS is what becoming WORLD CHAMPION is all about, and why it means so much more than #1: intangibles, as I've said before (in regards to Gelfand last year). Stepping up when it really counts.

    Let Kramnik and Anand have a rematch while Carlsen is off somewhere winning another meaningless supertournament. It will be a very interesting match!

  • hace 18 meses

    MSC157

    chessdoggblack nice words! :)

  • hace 18 meses

    Champeknight

    Yup, if ivanchuk loses against Kramnik on time trouble, there is your proof. I think Chucky is proud enough that he will avoid a losing position. But he can spend 30 minutes to make a move.

  • hace 18 meses

    Incrense

    @ajttja I just joined, give me admin. btw the name is spelled wrongly.. correct it thx

Ir arriba

Publique su respuesta: