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An Exciting Finale Expected In London

  • SonofPearl
  • on 09/12/12 12:41.

London Chess Classic 2012 logo.jpgThe penultimate round of the London Chess Classic produced four more excellent games, and set-up the final round for a thrilling conclusion.

Vladimir Kramnik kept the contest for first place alive by beating Gawain Jones in their encounter. That leaves him just 2 points behind leader Magnus Carlsen before the final round tomorrow (3-1-0 scoring).

Judit Polgar scored her first win of the tournament with the black pieces against Luke McShane. At last some reward for the efforts of the #1 rated women's player!

There have been many candidates for game of the tournament so far, but Vishy Anand's clash with Hikaru Nakamura must be a contender.  Both sides missed winning opportunities in a complicated game.  "Basically, I screwed up!" said Anand in the press conference, sparing Nakamura from losing on his 25th birthday!

Finally, Mickey Adams had a good position against an out-of-sorts Lev Aronian, but a draw was the end result.

Vladimir Kramnik could still beat Magnus Carlsen for first place

London Chess Classic 2012 Round 8 Vladimir Kramnik Gawain Jones.jpg

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Luke McShane succumbed to Judit Polgar

London Chess Classic 2012 Round 8 Luke McShane Judit Polgar.jpg

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Vishy Anand and Hikaru Nakamura provided great excitement in their game

London Chess Classic 2012 Round 8 Vishy Anand Hikaru Nakamura.jpg

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Lev Aronian and Mickey Adams drew their game

London Chess Classic 2012 Round 8 Lev Aronian Mickey Adams.jpg

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The standings after 8 rounds (3-1-0 scoring)

Name Fed Elo Gms Pts
Carlsen, Magnus NOR 2848 7 17
Kramnik, Vladimir RUS 2795 7 15
Adams, Michael ENG 2710 7 12
Nakamura, Hikaru USA 2760 7 10
Anand, Viswanathan IND 2775 7 8
Aronian, Levon ARM 2815 7 7
Polgar, Judit HUN 2705 7 5
McShane, Luke ENG 2713 7 5
Jones, Gawain C B ENG 2644 8 3

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The final round of the London Chess Classic starts 2 hours earlier than usual, at 12:00 GMT.  The time control is 2 hours for 40 moves, then 1 hour for 20 moves, then 30 minutes to finish.  The 'Bilbao' style 3-1-0 scoring system is in operation.

In the event of tied scores at the end of the competition, tie breaks are:

1) # of wins
2) # of wins with black
3) head-to-head result

If these mathematical tiebreakers are not enough, then there will be rapid tie-break games and if needed, a final sudden death game.

More information on all the London Chess Classic events is at the official website, including live games and video commentary.

Photos by Ray Morris-Hill.  Games via TWIC.

2012 London Chess Classic pairings shrink to fit.jpg

Leído 6916 veces 34 comentarios
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Comentarios


  • hace 21 meses

    SonofPearl

    @ epierard - thanks Smile

  • hace 21 meses

    PrinceAAwe

    And Carlsen wins the tournament with Kramnik drawing to Adams...

  • hace 21 meses

    SonofPearl

    @ kidpoolside - it certainly wasn't my intention to diminish Polgar's win.  I've been a fan of her for a long time. But reading it back, I can see how it might sound that way, so I've amended it to avoid that.

  • hace 21 meses

    novzki41

    Nakamura vs Anand the best game! 

  • hace 21 meses

    P_G_M

    @ sapientdust     Thank you for the links. 

    He intended to move the knight to c5 and then finally move it to f8. Accordingly to a video, not found in youtube, shows Kasparov's fingers were free of the knight (at c5) for six frames (meaning, at 24 frames per second, Kasparov had released the piece for ¼ of a second). And Kasparov told reporters that his conscience was clear, as he was not aware of his hand leaving the piece.

  • hace 21 meses

    sapientdust

    _valentin_: that's the silliest thing I've read on chess.com in quite a long time, and that is REALLY, REALLY saying something.

  • hace 21 meses

    _valentin_

    There's something to the letter K (or C, its other spelling in English) -- if your last name starts with it, then odds are you can be a world champion (or close): Karpov, Kasparov, Kramnik, C(K)arlsen....

    And also win major tournaments like this one, which has so far been won by only two players in its 4-year history, and will remain that way after tomorrow: Kramnik or C(K)arlsen.

  • hace 21 meses

    Estragon

    Anand's difficulty in recent tournaments may be in part due to the two-year championship match cycle.  Like Botvinnik, he has concentrated on the title matches over tournament play, and this may be a factor.  In fixed matches, forcing draws makes much more practical sense, and is the default bailout strategy.  But in tournaments, especially with the Sofia/London 3-1-0 scoring, this is a counterproductive strategy. 

    But for the World Champ, it makes more sense to maintain his match form than to try to alter his approach for tournaments.  He still commands a top appearance fee and conditions for tournaments due to his title, so his incentive is to keep the title, not to win tournaments.

  • hace 21 meses

    pinneese

    what happened to India's chess prodigy Vishy Anand?He is missing winning moves in the end game.It seems as one grows older his/her chess skills leave one by one.

  • hace 21 meses

    sapientdust

  • hace 21 meses

    kiloNewton

    Good games.

  • hace 21 meses

    Elubas

    It's probably because the game was basically Judit taking advantage of some weak moves, and it's likely that this was due to Luke's fatigue considering his past games. I don't think the comment diminishes the win in any way, as the win is still perfectly legitimate. Every player is responsible for keeping themselves in good physical condition throughout, and all face the same problem of having to play a lot of games.

    As SonofPearl said, Luke is called an amateur player, simply because he is an amateur player, the strongest one in the world in fact. I don't see how that's insulting at all -- in fact it's quite impressive to be a 2700 player when you have a full time job.

  • hace 21 meses

    Vingore

    Great going Judit!

  • hace 21 meses

    kidpoolside

    @ Firula and SonofPearl,

    Funny, I raised my eyebrow at the same comment.  However, I did so because it seemed dismissive of Polgar's win.  It seems to suggest that the only woman in the tournament won because "the amateur was tired".  They are all tired.  She is basically an equally skilled player and she soundly beat him.  

    SonofPearl,  I should mention that I appreciate your coverage of these tournaments and generally find your articles to be gracious and good spirited.  I expect your intension was not to diminish Polga'rs win.  I only mention it because i thought it was interesting that Firuli responded to the same comment in such a different way (and it is worth recognizing that it may in fact be a little dismissive).

    "If it's worth playing, it's worth playing badly" 

  • hace 21 meses

    P_G_M

    @ sapientdust and anyone who actually knows about this chess anecdotes.

    When did Kasparov "pulled a Garry"?

  • hace 21 meses

    Champeknight

    Kramnik was a big disappointment when he failed to win back the world championship from an aging Anand.  The future belongs to Magnus (#1 all time) and Levon.  Good effort though from Kramnik in this tourney.

  • hace 21 meses

    P_G_M

    This has been the most exciting tournament that I have witnessed!!!

  • hace 21 meses

    epierard

    Do you think that "finalé" is a word in french? Because it's not. Smile

    There's no accent on the e.

  • hace 21 meses

    Stanya

    and kramnik please beat mickey adams!!!

  • hace 21 meses

    Stanya

    please please beat magnus so kramnik can win anand!!!! 

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