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How would you tell your parents you want to make a living at chess?


  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #81

    bigpoison

    winerkleiner wrote:
     

    Lol, there you go!  Why does (mostly) everyone here think they can make a living playing chess?  It's difficult stuff, I would think more people would make lite of this encounter. 

    Why does (mostly) everyone here think that getting a college degree is somehow superior to devoting their lives to chess?

    If nothing else, chess is cheaper.

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #82

    goldendog

    bigpoison wrote:

    Why does (mostly) everyone here think that getting a college degree is somehow superior to devoting their lives to chess?

    If nothing else, chess is cheaper.

    Amen. It's scarcely even useful on the personal level--it's just a nice, interesting hobby.

    The greatest chess player ever isn't as useful as your garbageman.

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #83

    JamesCoons

    Its easy! First you tell them you want to be a professional basketball player. After a couple days you tell them you changed your mind and want to be a professional boxer. After a couple more days tell them you want to be a professional wrestler. When you finally tell them you are going to be a professional chess player they will be thrilled!

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #84

    pdve

    dress up like a ninja. sneak quietly into their bedroom at night while they sleep then whisper into their ear 'i want to make a living at chess', 'i want to make a living at chess', 'i want to make a living at chess'. This will have a subconscious effect.

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #85

    EricFleet

    StrengthInPawns wrote:
    Shivsky wrote:

     

    In fact, I associate visual thinkers with idiots, which is why I don't think you need to have an above average IQ to be good at chess. Look at Carlsen. Just a regular person when it comes to everything but chess.

    Interesting observation. I am a member of the Triple Nine Society, but am an absolute patzer at chess, especially shorter time controls. You have no idea how many times I have analyzed an illegal move for many seconds before realizing that the horsey doesn't move that way. I think in principles and my combinatory skills are weak.

    ... in longer time controls I do much better, both OTB and on chess.com.

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #86

    DENVERHIGH

    When I told her "Mom I want make a living playing Chess."

                      She asked me, "What is Chess?"

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #87

    Cashionova

    That's great.  I constantly wanted to be a pro Insert Hobby growing up.

    And honestly, it helped me gain a lot of perspective on the world and also a deep appreciation for the true masters of many fields...not to mention above average knowledge/experience in many hobbies..which is great for impressing people and networking.


    For instance, it will never hurt you to be able to beat the average joe at chess.

    I say go for it!  It will broaden your horizons.

    Just make sure you never undervalue your education...It is more important than you can possibly imagine at this point in your life.

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #88

    day_widni69

    Are you sure that is all you wanted to tell them?

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #89

    Sketchyfish

    Don't let complete strangers tell you what you can and cannot do.  You have a long life ahead of you, and these are the most important years.  I say do with them what you will.  I will say this, however:  If you need to ask yourself whether or not disconnecting entirely from reality to play chess is a good idea, then it is a very, VERY bad idea.

    If your goal is play chess non-stop for the next 20+ years of your life (at the dinner table, at your brothers wedding, on the toilet, etc.), then you would be far too busy playing chess to doubt yourself.  Obsession is a byproduct of ecstasy... and if you enjoy chess more than anyone else has ever enjoyed it, then you have the makings of a brilliant chess mind.  Did anyone ever tell you to do what you love?  No matter how farfetched?  Here's why:  

     

    The truth is (and this applies to all manner of crafts) most people on this planet have been robbed of their passion.  That is the essence of adulthood.  The biggest irony is that no one has the balls to do what they love most in this world.  I think that is why great minds like Mozart, Fischer, Newton, Goethe, etc. all seem to have superhuman qualities...  and as humans we like to subscribe to these romantic notions of "Heroes and Heroines" of mythical proportions..  but the truth is simple:  These men are who they are because they had the motivation to explore that which struck them most profoundly.  In short, there is nothing they would rather be doing.

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #90

    winerkleiner

    bigpoison wrote:
    winerkleiner wrote:
     

    Lol, there you go!  Why does (mostly) everyone here think they can make a living playing chess?  It's difficult stuff, I would think more people would make lite of this encounter. 

    Why does (mostly) everyone here think that getting a college degree is somehow superior to devoting their lives to chess?

    If nothing else, chess is cheaper.

    I went to college, I now make  .12 more than my non-college buddies!  More mixed messages.

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #91

    now_and_zen

    Sketchyfish wrote:

    Don't let complete strangers tell you what you can and cannot do.  You have a long life ahead of you, and these are the most important years.  I say do with them what you will.  I will say this, however:  If you need to ask yourself whether or not disconnecting entirely from reality to play chess is a good idea, then it is a very, VERY bad idea.

    If your goal is play chess non-stop for the next 20+ years of your life (at the dinner table, at your brothers wedding, on the toilet, etc.), then you would be far too busy playing chess to doubt yourself.  Obsession is a byproduct of ecstasy... and if you enjoy chess more than anyone else has ever enjoyed it, then you have the makings of a brilliant chess mind.  Did anyone ever tell you to do what you love?  No matter how farfetched?  Here's why:  

     

    The truth is (and this applies to all manner of crafts) most people on this planet have been robbed of their passion.  That is the essence of adulthood.  The biggest irony is that no one has the balls to do what they love most in this world.  I think that is why great minds like Mozart, Fischer, Newton, Goethe, etc. all seem to have superhuman qualities...  and as humans we like to subscribe to these romantic notions of "Heroes and Heroines" of mythical proportions..  but the truth is simple:  These men are who they are because they had the motivation to explore that which struck them most profoundly.  In short, there is nothing they would rather be doing.

     

    I must clarify this again:

    This post is not about me.  At my age (middle aged), and not terribly impressive as a chess player, I have no intention of trying to make a living with it, or even become a GM.  I stated the question hypothetically/humoursly, but I'm enjoying reading *all* of the replies.

    Also, got into sw engineering at 15 because I was very passionate about it.  To the exclusion of trig class one day.  I was working on a program in the computer club because I could only schedule that time slot.  My trig teacher stopped by and saw me there and gave me two weeks of detention and told me I'd never make anything of myself if I did that.  I am sure I've made a lot more money in my 35 year career than he ever did as the head of a HS math dept.  

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #92

    EricFleet

    reflectivist wrote:
     

    Also, got into sw engineering at 15 because I was very passionate about it.  To the exclusion of trig class one day.  I was working on a program in the computer club because I could only schedule that time slot.  My trig teacher stopped by and saw me there and gave me two weeks of detention and told me I'd never make anything of myself if I did that.  I am sure I've made a lot more money in my 35 year career than he ever did as the head of a HS math dept.  

    True. But do not confuse passion for a subject with the amount of income one will make. There are plenty of passionate art students who don't have two dimes to rub together.

    Life is about tradeoffs. Passion vs money in many cases. In some cases they align. In others, they dont. If money is not important to a person, it is easier to pursue passion.

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #93

    now_and_zen

    EricFleet wrote:
    reflectivist wrote:
     

    Also, got into sw engineering at 15 because I was very passionate about it.  To the exclusion of trig class one day.  I was working on a program in the computer club because I could only schedule that time slot.  My trig teacher stopped by and saw me there and gave me two weeks of detention and told me I'd never make anything of myself if I did that.  I am sure I've made a lot more money in my 35 year career than he ever did as the head of a HS math dept.  

    True. But do not confuse passion for a subject with the amount of income one will make. There are plenty of passionate art students who don't have two dimes to rub together.

    Life is about tradeoffs. Passion vs money in many cases. In some cases they align. In others, they dont. If money is not important to a person, it is easier to pursue passion.

    But the point is, he hurt my little feelings and punished me, and he was in some important ways wrong.  Now, who knows, maybe if I'd followed the straight and narrow and not my passions I could have done something great like become a GM or an Astronaut or a doctor.  I think following one's bliss takes courage.  Remember, if you don't follow your bliss, someone else will.

    There are a lot of passionate artists who have made a LOT of money after their death.

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #94

    EricFleet

    reflectivist wrote:
     

    But the point is, he hurt my little feelings and punished me, and he was in some important ways wrong.  Now, who knows, maybe if I'd followed the straight and narrow and not my passions I could have done something great like become a GM or an Astronaut or a doctor.  I think following one's bliss takes courage.  Remember, if you don't follow your bliss, someone else will.

    There are a lot of passionate artists who have made a LOT of money after their death.

    I think we are agreed on all points.

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #95

    AndyClifton

    bigpoison wrote:

    Why does (mostly) everyone here think that getting a college degree is somehow superior to devoting their lives to chess?

     

    Dammit, who let the prole in?

  • hace 14 meses · Citar · #96

    TheGrobe

    Pfff. Applied knowlege is overrated.

    In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice they are not.

    I'll stick to theory then, thanks,


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